Katherine Johnson, First women to help NASA send human into space

About Katherine Johnson’s

Katherine Johnson or Creole Katherine Coleman is a name which you probably didn’t hear of and that’s obvious,

This is because she was an African black woman and she was working at NASA in the US.

Now we will read more about her and you will be amazed to know more about her

Katherine Johnson was born in 26TH august 1918 at West Virginia, at a very young age she expressed her excellence in mathematics.

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Her love for mathematics didn’t stop her from studying further and she completed her graduation with degrees in mathematics and French at the age of 18.

Katherine Johnson work life

She also is known as Katherine Globe and got recognition because of her work at NASA

where she calculated flight trajectory for the first and second US crewed spaceflights.

She worked on Apollo moon mission helping them orbiting command and service module and also on the space shuttle program.

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At that time there are no equal rights for non-white US citizens so she uses a separate restroom

As well as a different eating facility made for the non-white staff.

Global recognition

Katherine Johnson’s story and her contributions to the US space program, along with Dorothy Vaughan who was a computer scientist and Mary Jackson who was an engineer,

Brought to public knowledge with the help of a book Hidden Figures written by Margot Lee Shetterly and a film released by the same name.

Her role portrayed by Taraji P. Henson as a lead character.

That film showed advancement in technology also showed the status of black people and the role of women in society.

Katherine Johnson achievements

In 2015 she honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom by the President Barack Obama.

She awarded with Silver Snoopy Award by a NASA astronaut Leland D. Melvin and also a NASA Group Achievement Award in the year 2016.

Katherine Johnson honored with the Congressional Gold Medal In the year 2019

Johnson finally rested her eyes at the age of 101 on February 24, 2020.

The administrator at NASA termed her “an American hero” and believed that her revolutionary legacy will never be forgotten.

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