Indian ‘Bars’ Sell Clean Oxygen As Air Pollution Spikes Up

You must have seen and heard of a great number of movies warning against the ever-increasing pollution. One most common thing we see in these movies is the regular use of bottled oxygen by characters.

These movies scare us at the moment we see them and we start thinking of how close is that situation?

How close are we to the time when we have to buy a breath of fresh air?

Let me tell you. We are almost there.

In fact, in Delhi, which is the most polluted city in India, people are already paying for pure air.

Oxy Pure- the first-ever oxygen bar of India

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Yes. It’s here already.

The first-ever oxygen bar of India, Oxy Pure, offers 15 minutes of pure oxygen to its customers in Rs 300. 

After the choking air condition of Delhi deteriorates, this bar offers just what people need at the moment- a breath of fresh air.

This bar was launched in May by Aryavir Kumar and Margarita Kuritsyana. It offers oxygen infused aromas like lemongrass, lavender, cherry, eucalyptus to its customers.

How does it work?

Now we told you that people can come and have some pure oxygen here. But how does it happen? 

We will now tell you how this pure oxygen is registered to the customers.

A lightweight tube called nasal canula is placed near the customer’s nostrils through which they breathe in the aroma-infused oxygen.

Each session promises to improve your sleep patterns and digestion, cure headaches and migraines and even help with depression.

The business of fresh air

The owner told NYT that people have gotten used to purchasing bottled water, so why not oxygen as well?

Yes, that definitely sounds scary for many reasons. To think that under the crushing economic breakdown, Indians might have to resort to such solutions is worrying on many levels.

But despite all the worries, how do you think this business is going on? We will tell you all about it.

Bonny Irengbam, a senior sales assistant at Oxy Pure said that many people were suspicious about it in the initial days. 

“Many people criticized, saying we were selling air, others were scared to breathe through the cannula,” Irengbam said.

 He said that after a few days of Diwali, as the pollution levels rose, more customers started coming in. “They have realized the need for it,” he said.

The bar also provides oxygen cans that can be carried around.

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