China’s Sky Eye May Have Detected Signals from Extraterrestrials

  • Sky Eye detected narrow-band electromagnetic signals from aliens 
  • They differ from the previously detected signals in the years 2019 and 2020 
  • Scientists have detected signals from extraterrestrial sources, but the signals have yet to be decoded

China’s “Sky Eye” telescope has detected signals that may have been transmitted by extraterrestrials, according to the reports published by the official newspaper of China Science and Technology Daily, but later being deleted by the scientists. China’s Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), nicknamed Sky Eye, with its 130-meter radio telescope in ping and peak operational frequency of 21 gigahertz, is a telescope with the ability to detect low-frequency radio bands, or radio signals, from extraterrestrial sources.

China’s FAST telescope detects extraterrestrial signals

China’s Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) is the world’s largest single-dish radio telescope located in the south-eastern province of Guizhou, China. The telescope is used by researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences to explore space, track asteroids, and search for extraterrestrial life. In 2016, FAST detected radio signals that are believed to have come from an extraterrestrial source. Scientists believe the signals came from an underwater source. The first signal FAST detected was stronger than the average radio signal that is naturally occurring in space. FAST resumed scanning the same area of space in November and December 2016, but did not detect the signal again. FAST scientists believe the signal may have been caused by water in a huge celestial body, possibly a dwarf star. Scientists used FAST to search for the signal again in June 2017 but did not detect the signal. Tonja believes FAST to be the first telescope to discover extraterrestrial civilizations.

The signal that may have been received by Sky Eye

Sky Eye, China’s telescope, has the ability to detect noise, or signals, from extraterrestrials up to one million light-years away. The telescope, which is said to be able to scan large swathes of the sky faster than its predecessors, has already found a number of pulsating stars and galaxies emitting strong radio waves. These narrow-band electromagnetic signals detected on June 14th, 2022 differ from the previously detected signals in 2019 and 2020, according to Zhang Tonjie, the head scientist at the China Extraterrestrial Civilization Research Group co-founded by Beijing Normal University. “The possibility that the suspicious signal is some kind of radio interference is also very high, and it needs to be further confirmed and ruled out. This may be a long process,” adds Zhang Tongji.

Scientists are investigating the possibility of creating a network of optical and radio observatories in Central Asia to detect extraterrestrial life. The observatories would be connected to each other via optical fibers and an existing network of radio telescopes. Central Asia is a good location for the proposed observatories because it is in a quiet part of the globe and has a low population density, providing astronomers with a better view of the sky. A network of Central Asian observatories would complement the FAST telescope’s low-frequency radio search for extraterrestrial life. Some scientists are investigating the possibility of creating a network of optical and radio observatories in Central Asia to detect extraterrestrial life. The observatories would be connected to each other via optical fibers and an existing network of radio telescopes.

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